The Wild Horses of Cotopaxi

The first time I went to Ecuador, I was on a massive road trip across South America. At this point, my experience with horses had been limited to seeing ponies at fairs when I was a child, and a scary horse ride in Northern Argentina. However, when I was in Ecuador later on in the … Continue reading The Wild Horses of Cotopaxi

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Travel Talk Tuesdays 4/8: Worst Travel Experiences

Today's Topic: Worst Experiences! 1) What do you hate the most about traveling? I hate repacking my backpack. The moment I get to a hostel (or any other kind of accommodation), things come flying out of my bag as I rush to see my surroundings. It's like this everyday. Things- clothes, toiletries, shoes, books, towels, etc.- almost never return … Continue reading Travel Talk Tuesdays 4/8: Worst Travel Experiences

Avoiding Wildlife Exploitation While Travelling

Animal rights have always been very important to me. I support causes like PETA, WWF, The Jane Goodall Institute, and even "adopted" an orangutan for a couple of years via The Orangutan Foundation International. At the age of 11, I became a vegetarian, and a little over two months ago, a vegan. I know I … Continue reading Avoiding Wildlife Exploitation While Travelling

Things Remembered, Names Forgotten

Even though the rain has ceased, Spring has sprung, and cherry blossoms are in full bloom throughout the city of Portland, their pink and white petals boasting vitality, my mind still wanders. I suppose this will always be the case; if my feet cannot roam, my imagination will. Meditations of the Caribbean pervade me: warm … Continue reading Things Remembered, Names Forgotten

Streets and Scenes of Bogota

Colombia. Drugs. Violence. Guerrillas. Death. Corruption. There is a common misconception within the US- and other first world countries- that these words are synonymous. I decided to write my Master's thesis on La Violencia, or "The Violence", in Colombia to prove that this notion was terribly false. From 1948 to 1958, the country experienced a massive … Continue reading Streets and Scenes of Bogota

Nuns at Teotihuacan

Back in 2005, I had the chance to visit one of the world's oldest UNESCO World Heritage sites. Teotihuacan, located about 45 minutes northeast of Mexico City, Mexico, was built by the Teotihuacanos sometime between the 1st and 7th century, A.D. Its massive structures include the Temple of the Sun, Temple of the Moon, and … Continue reading Nuns at Teotihuacan

13 Unforgettable Moments in 2013

Admittedly, the beginning of 2013 was quite a dreary one. As I wrote in the past, the months of February and March meant the end of an engagement, but also the beginning of a completely new life for me. I realized what it truly meant to love myself, and what I had been giving up in a futile attempt to … Continue reading 13 Unforgettable Moments in 2013

Hometown Parking Lot Blues

I wrote the following passage on a lunch break, just months after I had moved back to the United States from Argentina. 7/26/05 I sit in this hot, dusty parked car, listening to Los Fabulosos Cadillacs, daydreaming about being back in Buenos Aires. I watch a man across the way sizing up a truck like last … Continue reading Hometown Parking Lot Blues

Lama Temple Wishes

The Lama Temple, formally known as the Yonghe Temple, is one of the many historical sites in Beijing, China. Constructed in the late 17th century primarily as an imperial palace, it later became a place of worship for Tibetan Buddhists. It is known for its 85 foot, or 26 meter, statue of the Maitreya Buddha. While … Continue reading Lama Temple Wishes

Taiwan: The Call of Liberation

The thought of international travel seemed a wicked, impossible taunt just months ago. My passport lay abandoned and forlorn in my nightstand drawer, gathering dust as I struggled to crack the mold of weariness that enveloped me. I had spent over a month in LA working and visiting old friends, rearranging my life's unrecognizably morphed puzzle … Continue reading Taiwan: The Call of Liberation